Related articles

KTM 790 ADVENTURE AND KTM 790 ADVENTURE R REVEALED AS 2019 MODEL IN NORTH AMERICA

KTM 790 ADVENTURE AND KTM 790 ADVENTURE R REVEALED AS 2019 MODEL IN NORTH AMERICA

Tuesday, 06 November 2018 10:42 Published in Industry News


First Impression – 2019 KTM 790 Duke

Every fall, Milan, Italy provides the backdrop for the unveiling of the latest and greatest innovations from the motorcycle industry. When KTM rolled the production model of the 790 Duke onto EICMA’s world stage in November 2017, fans of naked bikes stood up and paid attention. Now, almost a full year later, with the production requirements for Europe’s motorcycle-centric population satisfied, the 790 Duke has arrived as a 2019 model in North America. When KTM called with an invitation to test out this machine on California’s sun-drenched twisties, the answer from IM was a resounding “YES!” Our full review will be in your mailbox and on newsstands in the near future, but in the interim here is a First Impression look at this exciting new motorcycle.

Upon initial glance, the 790 Duke fits right into the Duke family, sharing the same aggressive minimalist design right down to split LED headlight, but make no mistake: while the 790 Duke adds to the lineage of a lineup that will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the original Duke 620 in 2019, this motorcycle represents a new chapter for Austria’s best-known motorcycle manufacturer.

Seven62 Media 478

Developed with a goal of creating a mid-point in the brand’s street lineup, the 790 Duke is the culmination of over 100,000 man-hours that went into creating this motorcycle. At its heart is KTM’s all-new compact LC8c 799 cc DOHC liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine. In addition to being the company’s first foray into this configuration, the pairing of the engine as a load-bearing element of the chromium molybdenum tubular steel frame is another first for the company. Thanks in large part to this new frame design, the 790 Duke tips the scales with a svelte dry weight of just 169 kg (372.6 lb) and with a claimed 105 horsepower the resulting power-to-weight ratio moves it to the forefront of the highly competitive middleweight class. KTM representatives explained that the engine has been tuned to provide low-end torque without sacrificing the ability to pull power out at the top end. While it is easy to be skeptical of statements like these, it was immediately clear when riding the bike that the 790 Duke delivers on this goal as it pulls hard from the initial twist of the throttle right through to its 9,500 rpm redline.

Seven62 Media 256

Despite having a very reasonable Canadian MSRP of $11,499, the 790 Duke is loaded with standard features including up/down quick shifter, full-colour TFT display, WP suspension, steering damper, ride-by-wire throttle and power-assisted slipper clutch. In addition to Bosch-controlled lean-sensitive traction control, motor slip regulation and ABS, the 790 Duke includes selectable ride modes of Rain, Street and Sport as well as a Track setting which allows complete control over the level of rider aids including the ability to turn off wheelie control. True to KTM’s Ready to Race mantra, the inclusion of a Supermoto ABS setting, which allows the rider to disengage the cornering ABS on the rear tire, as well as the ability to set the shift linkage to a race pattern without additional parts will satisfy even the most dedicated track day enthusiasts. Need further proof of the abilities of this motorcycle? Take a visit to YouTube and check out Chris Fillmore’s record setting 2018 Pikes Peak run. Save for an exhaust system, rear sets, slick tires and removal of unnecessary street-legal components, the bike you see in the video is essentially the same one that is waiting for you on the showroom floor at KTM.

Seven62 Media 020

Anyone who has ridden the 1290 Super Duke or 390 Duke will find the upright, slightly pitched forward riding position very familiar, although the size of the 790 Duke actually feels more comparable to the 390. The ergonomics are very comfortable and thanks to KTM’s forethought to include ample adjustments – four options on the triple clamp plus three further options for rotation – the tapered aluminum handlebar can be positioned to meet a wide variety of physical reaches and riding preferences. Despite being raised to accommodate the level of ground clearance that the 790 Duke’s sporting intentions require, the footpegs are comfortably positioned and riders of various heights reported being impressed with the absence of any leg cramping or fatigue.

So, is the 790 Duke as good in real life as it is on paper? KTM refers to this model as “The Scalpel” which reflects the company’s stated ambition of creating “the sharpest street weapon.” In the case of the 790 Duke, these slick marketing slogans are also accurate descriptions of this motorcycle. From the first corner to the last, this motorcycle impressed with its uncanny confidence-inspiring ability to handle anything that was thrown at it. Light and manoeuvrable, the 790 Duke moves from side to side with ease and tracks perfectly through corners at grin-inducing lean angles. It accelerates with a ferocity that will make its competitors nervous and is built to be equally capable commuting across town as it is carving through canyons or tearing up the track. On top of all of this it looks great, sounds awesome and is surprisingly comfortable. Add in an $11,499 MSRP and it looks like KTM has a winning formula.

Seven62 Media 453

2019 KTM 790 Duke
Canadian MSRP: $11,499
Colours: Orange, Grey
Engine: Liquid-cooled DOHC parallel-twin
Displacement: 799 cc
Power: 105 hp @ 9,000 rpm
Torque: 64 ft-lb @ 8,000 rpm
Frame: Chromium molybdenum tubular steel with engine as stressed element
Weight: 169 kg (382.6 lb), dry
Wheelbase: 1,475 mm (58.1 in)
Seat height: 825 mm (32.5 in)
Suspension (front): WP inverted 43 mm fork
Suspension (rear): WP shock absorber with adjustable preload
Brakes (front): dual 300 mm discs with radially mounted 4 piston calipers
Brakes (rear): 240 mm disc with 2 piston caliper
Fuel Capacity: 14 L

Friday, 26 October 2018 12:48 Published in Products


KTM UNVEILS 2019 KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE GT & R MODELS AT INTERMOT; KTM 790 DUKE COMES TO NORTH AMERICA IN NOVEMBER

MURRIETA, Calif. – Earlier today at the INTERMOT show in Cologne, Germany, KTM unveiled a sharper, stronger and more refined version of its premium sports tourer with the 2019 KTM SUPER DUKE GT, while ‘THE BEAST’ KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R receives two new graphics options. In addition to the exciting global releases, KTM North America, Inc. is pleased to introduce the 2019 KTM 790 DUKE to the North American market, making its way to KTM Dealerships this November.

Tuesday, 09 October 2018 19:45 Published in Industry News


2018 MOTOGP SEASON SO FAR: HALF A SEASON OF PROGRESS

As MotoGP gathers in Brno for the Grand Prix of Czech Republic this weekend Red Bull KTM Factory Racing sits 14th (Pol Espargaro) and 19th in the current MotoGP FIM World Championship standings and 5th in the Constructor’s table after nine rounds of nineteen in the 2018 campaign.

Thursday, 02 August 2018 10:10 Published in Rider and Team Releases


KTM AND CHRIS FILLMORE SET TO RETURN TO PIKES PEAK INTERNATIONAL HILL CLIMB WITH THE DEBUT OF THE KTM 790 DUKE

MURRIETA, Calif. – Following a record-breaking 2017 performance up Pikes Peak Mountain with the KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R, Chris Fillmore and KTM’s Media Racing Department are set to return for the 96th running of the iconic Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, this time aboard the Austrian brand’s latest tool in its street arsenal, the KTM 790 DUKE.

Saturday, 16 June 2018 08:57 Published in Rider and Team Releases


KTM COMMITTED TO IMPROVING MOTORCYCLE SAFETY

KTM has demonstrated its commitment to improving safety for motorcyclists and reducing accidents as the first motorcycle manufacturer to demonstrate Adaptive Cruise Control and Blind Spot Detection systems.

Wednesday, 06 June 2018 18:44 Published in Products


HELP WANTED: KTM Canada - Marketing Specialist

CHAMBLY, QC – What are you waiting for? Climb to the top with KTM!

Wednesday, 23 May 2018 13:33 Published in Industry News


Trevitt's Blog: Can Two-Strokes Make a Comeback?

KTM and Husqvarna recently announced that they will be producing two fuel-injected two-stroke models for 2018, as part of their respective enduro lineups. (The Husqvarnas will be essentially rebadged KTMs, as are most of the company's models.) While most manufacturers, including KTM and Husqvarna, offer a range of two-stroke dirt bikes, there have been few two-stroke street bikes of any note since the demise of the Yamaha RZ350 in the mid-nineties. The KTM and Husqvarna announcements, even though covering enduro models, could be the beginning of a trend that sees two-strokes making a comeback in the on/off-road market, and perhaps eventually street bikes.

Two-strokes offer less weight, fewer moving parts, less friction and - of course - twice the number of power strokes than four-strokes, for substantially more performance in a given displacement. On the downside, however, emissions and fuel economy are significantly worse. There are two issues here: One is that in the two-stroke cycle, the transfer ports (that "transfer" the fuel/air mixture from the crankcase into the cylinder) are open at the same time as the exhaust port, and for a significant portion of the cycle. During this time, unburnt fuel can go directly out the exhaust, affecting emissions considerably. The second issue is that, because the fuel/air mixture in a conventional two-stroke passes through the crankcase, the lubricating oil for the big-end and main bearings ends up being burnt along with the fuel, also affecting emissions. The writing was on the wall for two-stroke street bikes in the early eighties, with increasingly strict emissions laws being more and more difficult for the manufacturers to comply with.

In the mid-nineties, Bimota manufactured the V-Due, a 500 cc two-stroke V-twin street bike. The V-Due worked around the emissions issues by using fuel injection and forced lubrication for the bottom end. Ideally, a two-stroke would use direct fuel injection, where fuel is injected into the combustion chamber (rather than the throttle body) after the exhaust port is closed, to minimize emissions. This technology has issues of its own, however, and the V-Due used transfer port injection. While not an optimum solution, in this setup only air goes through the throttle body, into the crankcase and up the transfer ports; the fuel is finally injected in the transfer ports, where it can't pick up the lubricating oil. As well, the exhaust port can be almost closed when the fuel is introduced, minimizing how much goes directly out the exhaust unburnt.

With a separate lubrication system for the V-Due's bottom end, and only air going through the crankcase, the amount of oil that made it to the combustion chamber was also minimized. While the bike did pass US emissions standards at the time, it had significant issues with rideability attributed to the fuel injection, and eventually the system was scrapped altogether in favour of carburetors. Even then the model had continuing issues, and was largely blamed for the company's bankruptcy.

While little was revealed in the KTM and Husqvarna press releases, the KTM version did indicate that the new bikes use transfer port injection, like the V-Due. Certainly the technology has progressed significantly since the V-Due's time, and KTM promises "a completely new experience in terms of power delivery and rideability." KTM, and other manufacturers, have surely been working on two-stroke fuel injection for some time, and the technology is very common in the marine and snowmobile market. If the new KTMs deliver on those promises of rideability and power delivery, it may open the floodgates for the other manufacturers to follow suit.

What will the holdup be for street bikes? The RZ350 and V-Due had a difficult time meeting the relatively relaxed emissions standards of their time, and the current Euro 4 standard is extremely difficult even for clean-burning four-strokes to meet. Load up a two-stroke with direct injection, an elaborate lubrication system, exhaust valves and other extras to meet today's standards, and cost, weight and complexity quickly approach the four-stroke realm. (Note on the image above all the extra equipment tacked onto the cylinder of the KTM engine.) Additionally, in the last 20 years since the V-Due, four-stroke technology has improved considerably and closed the gap to two-stroke performance.

The media launches of the new KTM and Husqvarna models are mid-May, at which time we'll know more about the technology used and if it could potentially be applied to street bikes. It may be wishful thinking on my part, but I don't think I'm alone in wondering how something like an up-to-date RZ500 would compare to a current four-stroke litrebike.

Friday, 07 April 2017 12:16 Published in Andrew Trevitt


Exclusive MotoGP Season Preview: Is Vinales Ready?

The 2017 racing season gets fully underway this weekend under the lights, in the desert at the Losail Circuit in Qatar, at the first of 18 scheduled MotoGP rounds. After a crazy 2016 season with an unprecedented nine race winners, attention at the top tier of motorcycle racing is steadily building.

Friday, 24 March 2017 11:51 Published in Feature Stories


Ride review: 2017 KTM 1290 Super Adventure R! (with photos)

For the international launch of its flagship new adventure model, the 2017 1290 Super Adventure R, KTM picked the desert landscape of Paracas, Peru, four hours south of the capital city Lima. The desert terrain doesn’t reflect what we typically encounter here in Canada, but with this region having hosted Dakar stages in 2012, we knew that there were going to be excellent opportunities to test the off-road capabilities of the R version of the 1290 Super Adventure.

Thursday, 23 March 2017 16:51 Published in Feature Stories


Page 1 of 2